Swing!: / A Scanimation Picture Book

Citation: Seder, R. B. (2008b). Swing!: A Scanimation Picture Book. New York: Workman Pub.Swing!

Ages: 0-8

Grades: Babies – Kindergarten

Description: Seder’s follow up book to the previously mentioned Gallop! focuses on children in motion. Swing!  asks readers if they can perform a variety of sports-themed activities, such as: running, kicking a ball,  and swinging a bat. The book features vibrantly-colored rhyming text in contrast with black and white scanimation images. The images are acetate paper overlays on board pages, that give the illusion of movement.

Uses:  Seder’s Swing!  is ideal for a sport-themed storytime with young children.  The book is best used in small group settings, so all readers can see the movement in the images.  Librarians and adults can read the book with children, teaching them the concepts of each action and each sport. Children can then be lead in the movements, or in small group sporting activities. For example, a librarian could read the story, and then lead students in a game of catch with foam balls.  This could be done with many of the different activities in the book. Librarians and adults could also ask students to mimic each action along with the book text. Swing!’s scanimation images will help capture attention and demonstrate sport and movement concepts to children. In addition to children, the book would be ideal for engaging reluctant readers who have an interest in sports and teens and adults who are differently-abled.

Review Sources:

Swing!. (2008). Publishers Weekly, 255(38), 58.

Seder, R. B. (n.d). Swing!

Search Terms: baseball, sports, differently-abled, rhyme

Dunk Skunk

Citation: Rex, M. (2005). Dunk skunk. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons.Dunk Skunk

Ages: 2-5

Grades: PreK – K

Description: Dunk Skunk is a simple story of animals engaged in different types of sports. Each page depicts the animals in action, and the story is told with simple, two word rhymes such as “Coach Roach” or “Hurdle Turtle.”  The book has bright, large images and text.

Uses: Dunk Skunk’s large text, simple rhyme, and humorous feeling make it an ideal text for a family or toddler storytime. The animals moving in different ways will inspire children to go and play different sports. There are several ways librarians could incorporate actions into storytimes with this text: first, librarians could read the story, and then lead the children in a storytime appropriate sports game, such as quiet ball. Second, librarians could read the story and ask children to mimic the movements of the animals in the story: they can pretend to dunk, to throw a football, etc.

Review Sources:

Roach, J. (2005). Dunk Skunk. School Library Journal, 51(4):110.

Dunk Skunk. (2005). Kirkus Reviews, 73(3), 181.

Tags:  animals, sports, rhyme

Watch Me Do Yoga

Citation: Clennell, B. (2010). Watch Me Do yoga. Berkeley, CA: Rodmell Press. Watch Me Do Yoga

Ages: 2-8

Grades: PreK – 3

Description: Watch Me Do Yoga follows a young girl as she does different yoga poses with the people and things around her, such as her mom, dad, dog, and a tree. The story is told from the young girl’s perspective, and she relates the poses to the world and objects around her, while she describes them. For example: in doing mountain pose with her mom, she stands still, tall and strong.  The images reflect the movements described in the text.

Uses:  Clennell’s text could be used by teachers and librarians during a young child or preschool program.  The book can be read aloud, while the children and leader try each pose. This text would also be useful in a program with parents/guardians and their children, where they can do the poses and movements together.

Review Sources: none.

Search Terms: exercise, hatha yoga, yoga, sports

Get Up and Go!

Citation: Carlson, N. L. (2006). Get up and go! New York: Viking. get up and go

Ages: 0- 8

Grades: PreK – 1

Description:  Carlson’s text begins by telling readers: “You are special!” and that no matter if you are “tall, short, skinny or round” that it is important to take care of your body!  She then directly challenges readers to get out from behind the screen, and to get out and get some exercise. Throughout the book, the animal characters take part in a number of different types of physical activities, and with the text frankly, yet delicately, explaining the importance of physical activity, and what parts of the body physical activity can help.  

Uses: Carlson’s text is a direct challenge to the readers to get up and get moving. It is ideal to use in a storytime about the importance of exercise our about being healthy. The way Carlson presents the information highlights that this book could be used to introduce young children to healthy lifestyles. The book could also be useful in a family, toddler, or preschool storytime where adult family members and/or guardians are present, to also encourage them to get up and get moving, and/or to understand the importance of physical activity. This book could be used in a storytime program as a lead in or explanation before the teacher or librarian leads children through a group exercise.

Review Sources:

Jonas, JoAnn. (2006). Get Up and Go! [Review of the book Get Up and Go!]. School Library Journal, 52(2): 94

Phelan, C. (2005). Get Up and Go! [Review of the book Get Up and Go]. Booklist, 102(7):52.

Kirkus Reviews. (2005).  Get Up and Go. [Review of the book Get Up and Go]. Kirkus Reviews, 73(23):1271

Tags:  exercise, non-fiction, animals, dance, hiking, sports

From Head to Toe

Citation: Carle, E. (1997). From head to toe. New York, NY: HarperCollins. From Head to Toe

Ages: 0-8

Grades: PreSchool – Grade 2

Description:  In From Head to Toe, Carle invites children to mimic the movements of different animals. The book is written in a question and answer format, which encourages the reader’s participation.

Use: From Head to Toe is an ideal book for a preschool or toddler storytime. The large, colorful images will be easily seen by the whole group, and the question and answer format will instantly have children attempting to mimic the motions of the animals.  The book can be used during a program on animals, or in a Carle-themed celebration.

Review Sources:

Devereaux, E. & Roback, D. (1997). Forecasts: Children’s books. Publisher’s Weekly, 244(7):210.

Kirkus Reviews. (1997).  From Head to Toe. [Review of the book From Head to Toe]. Retrieved from: http://web.a.ebscohost.com/novp/detail?vid=5&sid=1152e847-25f0-4743-982f-e5217215a78a%40sessionmgr4004&hid=4109&bdata=JnNpdGU9bm92cC1saXZl#UI=103643&db=neh

Tags: animal movements, sports