Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed

Citation:  Christelow, E. (1989). Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed. New York: Clarion House.  

Ages: 0 – 6

Grades:  PreKindergarten – 1st Grade

Description:  Christelow’s Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed is a classic book about counting. The monkeys jump on the bed and fall off one by one, until there are no monkeys left.

Uses: This book is a storytime classic! The rhyming text and repetitive phrases make this an idea book for young child and/or toddler storytime.  Librarians can make this book active by getting children to act out the monkey’s movements.  Children can jump with the monkeys jump, and make monkey movements during the book.

Review Sources:

Camarata, C., Jones, T. E., Gale, D., & Suhr, V. M. (1989). Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed (Book). School Library Journal, 35(11), 62.

Tags: concept books, counting, monkeys, rhyme, animals, jumping

How Can You Dance?

Citation: Walton, R., & López-Escrivá, A. (2001). How Can You Dance? New York: Putnam’s.How Can You Dance?

Ages: 0 – 8

Grades: PreSchool – 3

Description:  With rhyming text, How Can You Dance? asks children how they move and dance, and then compares it to the movement of an animal. For example, the book asks “How can you dance as you swim in a pool? Dance like a frog, feeling fine, keeping cool.”  After each rhyming line, the book includes instructions on how to move like the animal example.

Uses:  With its rhyming text and question and answer style, this book is sure to get kids off their feet! The book can be used in storytime to get kids moving, and can be used with differently abled adults and children.

Review Sources:

Cooper, I. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). Booklist, 1897.

Jones, T.E., Toth, L., Charnizon, M., Grabarek, D., Larkins, J., & Ceraldi, G. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). School Library Journal, 47(7), 90.

Roback, D., Brown, J. M., & Britton, J. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). Publishers Weekly, 248(24),85.

Search Terms: rhyme, animals, animal movements, dance, diversity, differently-abled 

Waddle!

Citation: Seder, R. B. (2009). Waddle! New York: Workman Pub.Waddle

Ages: 0- 5

Grades: Babies – PreK

Description:  In Waddle! Seder asks readers if they can move like a variety of animals: “Can you hop like a frog?/ Can you Waddle like a penguin?”  Each question is accompanied by an image of the animal performing the specific action. The animal images are acetate paper overlayed on board pages, and when the pages are turned, the image gives the appearance that the animal is moving.  Unlike Seder’s other scanimation books, the animal images in Waddle! are in color. These images are paired with a colorful, bright rhyming text.

Uses: Librarians, teachers, and other adults can use Seder’s Waddle! in a storytime programs for babies and toddlers. The simple text will automatically engage readers and listeners, and librarians can get children moving by encouraging them to mimic the movement of the particular animal after each page is read. The book is best used in a small group storytime, so all children can see the colorful scanimation images and their movement. The book can also be used to teach simple movement concepts to children within the context of a storytime based on animals, farm animals, or any related topic.  The scanimation images will also draw attention to the book, which make it ideal for a display. If on display, the direct nature of the text can engage children on an individual basis.

Review Sources:

Lilien-Harper, A. (2010). Waddle!. School Library Journal, 56(1), 81-82

Waddle!. (2009). Publisher’s Weekly, 256(42), 54.

Search Terms:  animals, animal movements, rhyme

Swing!: / A Scanimation Picture Book

Citation: Seder, R. B. (2008b). Swing!: A Scanimation Picture Book. New York: Workman Pub.Swing!

Ages: 0-8

Grades: Babies – Kindergarten

Description: Seder’s follow up book to the previously mentioned Gallop! focuses on children in motion. Swing!  asks readers if they can perform a variety of sports-themed activities, such as: running, kicking a ball,  and swinging a bat. The book features vibrantly-colored rhyming text in contrast with black and white scanimation images. The images are acetate paper overlays on board pages, that give the illusion of movement.

Uses:  Seder’s Swing!  is ideal for a sport-themed storytime with young children.  The book is best used in small group settings, so all readers can see the movement in the images.  Librarians and adults can read the book with children, teaching them the concepts of each action and each sport. Children can then be lead in the movements, or in small group sporting activities. For example, a librarian could read the story, and then lead students in a game of catch with foam balls.  This could be done with many of the different activities in the book. Librarians and adults could also ask students to mimic each action along with the book text. Swing!’s scanimation images will help capture attention and demonstrate sport and movement concepts to children. In addition to children, the book would be ideal for engaging reluctant readers who have an interest in sports and teens and adults who are differently-abled.

Review Sources:

Swing!. (2008). Publishers Weekly, 255(38), 58.

Seder, R. B. (n.d). Swing!

Search Terms: baseball, sports, differently-abled, rhyme

Gallop! / A Scanimation Picture Book

Citation: Seder, R. B. (2007). Gallop! / A Scanimation Picture Book. New York: Workman Pub.Gallop!

Ages: 0 – 5

Grades: Babies – PreK

Description:  Gallop! /A Scanimation Picture Book encourages readers to gallop, swing, run, and jump like a variety of different animals. Seder brings the animals’ action to life with paper over board page images and a pull tab that readers can move to make the animal look as though it is moving. The black and white images are paired with brightly colored rhyming text to create a visually appealing and engaging book for babies and toddlers.

Uses:  Seder’s Gallop!/A Scanimation Picture Book can be effectively used in a small group baby or toddler time. The moving images will capture children’s attention, and the rhyming text explicitly engages them in mimicking the animals’ movements.  This book can also be used to introduce movement concepts to young children in small group or individual settings. Children can see the animals’ movement, and then mimic on their own. This title could also be used to engage differently-abled elementary children or teens.  The technology used in the book also make it ideal for display; and with the direct nature of the questions in the text (“Can you slide like a chimp?”) adults and children reading independently may mimic on their own.  Also, this book should be considered for use in teaching parents/guardians information literacy skills and ways to engage their young child with books and reading at a young age. Librarians can use books that promote activity, with obvious engagement and appeal factors, to teach ways to engage with the text.

Review Sources:

Just, J. (2008). GALLOP!. New York Times Book Review, 21.

Seder, R. B. (n.d). Gallop!

Gallop!: A Scanimation Picture Book. (2007). Publishers Weekly, 254(47), 52.

Search Terms: scanimation, animals, animal movements, parents and children, rhyme, differently-abled 

Dogi the Yogi

Citation: Scrivan, M. N. (2008). Dogi the Yogi. Outbox Media.Dogi the Yogi

Ages: 4 – 8

Grades:  PreK – 1

Description:  Meet Dogi, a bright yellow dog who enjoys yoga. In this book, Dogi introduces children to a variety of different yoga poses; including the wheel pose, lion pose, and shivasana. Each pose is accompanied by a drawing of Dogi doing the pose, as well as rhyming text that explains the pose and its benefits.

Uses:  The bright pictures, and simple, rhyming text of Dogi the Yogi make it an ideal resource for introducing children to yoga in a group storytime. Librarians and teachers can read each page, and lead children through the different poses along with Dogi. This book would also be well used in a family storytime, so that librarians and teachers can teach both parents and children yoga together. Dogi the Yogi’s inviting cover will also make this book ideal for display.

Review Sources: none.

Tags: yoga, animals, rhyme

Dunk Skunk

Citation: Rex, M. (2005). Dunk skunk. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons.Dunk Skunk

Ages: 2-5

Grades: PreK – K

Description: Dunk Skunk is a simple story of animals engaged in different types of sports. Each page depicts the animals in action, and the story is told with simple, two word rhymes such as “Coach Roach” or “Hurdle Turtle.”  The book has bright, large images and text.

Uses: Dunk Skunk’s large text, simple rhyme, and humorous feeling make it an ideal text for a family or toddler storytime. The animals moving in different ways will inspire children to go and play different sports. There are several ways librarians could incorporate actions into storytimes with this text: first, librarians could read the story, and then lead the children in a storytime appropriate sports game, such as quiet ball. Second, librarians could read the story and ask children to mimic the movements of the animals in the story: they can pretend to dunk, to throw a football, etc.

Review Sources:

Roach, J. (2005). Dunk Skunk. School Library Journal, 51(4):110.

Dunk Skunk. (2005). Kirkus Reviews, 73(3), 181.

Tags:  animals, sports, rhyme

Pretend You’re a Cat

Citation: Marzollo, J., & Pinkney, J. (1990). Pretend You’re a Cat. New York: Dial Books for Young Readers.  Cat

Ages: 4 – 8

Grades: PreK – 8

Description:  Pretend You’re a Cat invites readers and listeners to move like various animals: a cat, a dog, a fish, and a bee. Marzollo uses a repetitive rhyming text to invite children to move along with the story. There are also richly detailed images of children and animals doing the movements throughout the story.

Uses: Pretend You’re a Cat is ideal for a family or young child storytime. The story can be read out loud, and children can participate along with the story.  The images in this story will also draw in listeners with the vibrant images.

Review Sources:

Dibner, E. (1990). Pretend You’re a Cat (Book). School Library Journal 36(7), 63.

Fader, E. (1990). Pretend You’re a Cat. Horn Book Magazine, 66(4), 446-447.

Tags: animals, animal movements, rhyme, diversity, differently-abled

The Hokey Pokey

Citation: La Prise, L., Macak, C. P., Baker, T., & Hamanaka, S. (1996). The hokey pokey. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.The Hokey Pokey

Ages: 4 – 9

Grades: PreK – 3

Description:  In this book, La Prise covers all of the lyrics of the original Hokey Pokey song.  On each page, children and animals dance along to the lyrics of the traditional rhyme.

Uses: La Prise’s text can be used in a preschool or younger elementary storytime or program. Since many children know the rhyme, it would be easy to invite them to join in and move with the story as it is read.  It can also be read to small children who have not heard the Hokey Pokey, or who are learning to distinguish their left from their right.  This could also be used in a program about music, or to perhaps entice a reluctant reader to read.

Review Sources:

Devereaux, E. & Roback, D. (1997). Forecasts: Children’s books. Publisher’s Weekly, 244(1):72.

Morgan, K. (1997). Starred reviews: Books for youth. Booklist, 93(11):940.

Search Terms: dance, rhyme, nursery rhyme, animals, 

Bouncing Time

Citation: Hubbell, P., & Sweet, M. (2000). Bouncing time. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. Bouncing Time

Ages: 0 – 4

Grades: Pre-K

Description: Bouncing Time is the story of a young child and her mother as they take a day trip to the zoo. The pair see different animals at the zoo: tigers tumble, while monkeys somersault.  Eventually the pair bounce home and through the evening activities until bed.  

Uses: Bouncing Time is ideal for a baby/guardian storytime, or a young toddler storytime where parents/guardians are with their children. The book encourages interaction between parents and children. Librarians can read the book and parents can move their babies to the different activities: ex – bounce the baby while the giraffes jump, etc.  For toddlers, librarians can ask them to mimic the movements of the different animals. For this book, librarians should encourage parents/guardians to interact with the children, thus providing not only a storytime activity, but also a chance to share information literacy skills with parents.

Review Sources:

Blair, Janet. (2000). Bouncing Time. School Library Journal, 46(7):80.

Segal, Marta. (2000). Books for youth: Books for Young. Booklist, 96(15); 1469.

Tags: zoo, animals, bouncing, rhyme