Yoga for Teens

Citation: Schenk, S. (2016). Yoga for Teens. Twin Lakes, Wisconsin: Lotus Press.

Ages: 13 – 17

Grades: 8 – 12

Description: Yoga for Teens is a great resource for intermediate and high school-aged teens to learn different yoga exercises, meditation techniques, and breathing exercises. Each chapter in the book focuses ways yoga may be used to cope with an emotion that teens may face in their daily lives. The author includes anecdotes from her life during her teenage years to help relate to readers. 

Uses: Yoga for Teens can be used with teenagers in library programs to introduce teens to yoga and meditation concepts and poses. The book can also be included in a book display for teens promoting mental health coping strategies and exercise.  

Review Sources: None found

Tags: yoga, meditation, differently-abled

Just Breathe: Meditation, Mindfulness, Movement, and More

Citation: Chopra, Mallika. (2018). Just breathe: meditation, mindfulness, movement, and more. Philadelphia: RP Kids.

Ages: 8-12

Grades: 3 – 7

Description: Just Breathe is a great guide for young adults to use for meditation, yoga, movement, and other mindfulness exercises. This book is full of exercises for beginners and more experienced youth looking for advice on managing stress, building self-confidence, and reducing anxiety.   The images reflect the movements described in the text.

Uses:  Chopra’s text could be used by teachers, and librarians during a young adult program. The book can be read aloud, while readers try some of the exercises described and demonstrated through out the book. This text would also be useful in a program with parents/guardians and their children, where they can do the exercises and movements together.

Review Sources: none.

Tags: exercise, yoga, meditation, diversity, differently-abled

Toddler Play (Gymboree)

Citation: Masi, Wendy. (2001). Toddler Play (Gymboree). New York, NY: Creative Publishing International.

Ages: Adults and their toddlers

Grades: n/a

Description: Toddler Play (Gymboree) is a book for parents and other adults who are interested in incorporating fun activities for quality play time. The book covers age-appropriate playtime activities, including active physical games for strengthening growing muscles. 

Uses: Masi’s text can be used by parents, librarians, and teachers as they plan fun play activities for toddlers.  The book can also be put on display in a library as a resources for adults with growing children.

Review Sources:

Broocker, Deborah. (2004). Itsy Bitsy Yoga: Poses To Help Your Baby Sleep Longer, Digest Better, and Grow Stronger (Book). Library Journal, (129)(7):116.

Tags: exercise, parents and children, diversity, differently-abled

Dinosaur Dance!

Citation: Boynton, S. (2016). Dinosaur Dance! New York, NY: Little Simon Books.

Ages: 1 – 6

Grades: PreSchool – 2nd

Description: Dinosaur Dance! encourages readers to dance along with prehistoric creatures in this interactive, fun board book.

Uses: This board book can be used by parents or teachers to promote physical activity among young readers. Readers can mimic the dances performed by the dinosaurs in the book, learn the names of different types of dinosaurs, and learn about colors.

Review Sources: none.

Search Terms: rhyme, animals, animal movements, dance,  differently-abled 

I Love Yoga (Yoga for Kids)

Citation: Chryssicas, M. K. (2006). I Love Yoga (Yoga for Kids). London: Dorling Kindersley. I love yoga

Ages: 8-12

Grade: K – 5

Description:  Chryssicas’ I Love Yoga (Yoga for Kids) introduces children to hatha yoga. The story follows several children and their teacher through a typical yoga class, covering topics such as clothing, breathing, different poses, and benefits of doing yoga.  Basic poses and movements are demonstrated to the reader through pictures, and there is a glossary of terms in the back of the book. The text also includes different yoga games that may intrigue children.

Uses:   I Love Yoga (Yoga for Kids) would be ideal to use in a class or program with elementary aged children. The children could read the book as a small group, and then try different poses. Or, the book could be read aloud by a teacher or librarian, and the librarian/teacher could lead students through the poses as the story progresses. This would allow the children in the storytime to feel as though they are participating in the yoga class from the story  as well.  Additionally, this book would be great resource for librarians who want to to a yoga-themed storytime. Chryssicas’ text both educates about yoga, and provides students with a story.  

Review Sources:

Hayes, J. (2006). I Love Yoga. [Review of the book I Love Yoga]. School Library Journal, 52(5):108.

Engberg, Gillian. (2005). I Love Yoga. [Review of the book I Love Yoga]. Booklist, 102(6):39.

Tags: yoga, non-fiction, hatha yoga, differently-abled

You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses

You Are a LionCitation: Yoo, T. (2012). You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses. New York, NY: Nancy Paulsen Books.

Ages: 2 – 7

Grades: PreK – 2

Description: Yoo’s You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses introduces young children to yoga by inviting them to mimic the actions of different animals.   The book introduces children to different poses through simple movement instructions. Children are taught to be animals such as a butterfly, a frog, a lion, and a snake.  Pose instructions are accompanied by two page spreads of children of different ethnicities and animals doing the poses in the appropriate habitats for the animal.

Uses: You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses is perfect for introducing yoga during a young child or family storytime. The simple text in the book is not only ideal for young children who are learning concepts, but also for librarians and adults with no or little knowledge of yoga.  The book’s text, as well as the two page spreads invite children and readers to move along with the animals.  The book is also ideal for programs with differently-abled teens and older children.

Review Sources:

Oliver, S. (2012). You are a Lion! and Other Fun Yoga Poses.  School Library Journal, 58(3), 140.

Peters, J. (2012). You Are a Lion! And Other Fun Yoga Poses. Booklist, 108(13), 95.

You are a Lion! And Other Fun Yoga Poses. (2012). Kirkus Reviews, 80(4), 424.

Tags:
non-fiction, yoga, differently-abled, animals

Little Yoga: A Toddler’s First Book of Yoga

Little YogaCitation: Whitford, R., & Selway, M. (2005). Little Yoga: A Toddler’s First Book of Yoga. New York: Henry Holt and Co.

Ages: 0-4

Grades: PreSchool

Description: Little Yoga: A Toddler’s First Book of Yoga, is an illustrated guide to simple yoga poses for young children. The book pairs drawings of children doing different poses with actual photos of children demonstrating each pose. The book also contains a note, with safety tips and advice  to parents and adults who are interested in using yoga with toddlers.

Uses: Little Yoga: A Toddler’s First Book of Yoga can be used by librarians and teachers to demonstrate yoga poses to young children. While the book is not conducive to storytimes, it can be used in conjunction with another book, either in displays, or in a book talk. Librarians and teachers can suggest this title to adults and caregivers who are interested in yoga for their children.

Review Sources:

Engberg, G. (2005). Little Yoga: A Toddler’s First Book of Yoga. Booklist, 102(3), 60.

Tabuchi, D. (2005). Little Yoga: A Toddler’s First Book of Yoga. School Library Journal, 51(11), 122.

Talen, N. (2007). Little Yoga and Sleepy Little Yoga. Ascent Magazine, (35), 62-63.

Search Terms: yoga, animals, parents and children, differently-abled, non-fiction

How Can You Dance?

Citation: Walton, R., & López-Escrivá, A. (2001). How Can You Dance? New York: Putnam’s.How Can You Dance?

Ages: 0 – 8

Grades: PreSchool – 3

Description:  With rhyming text, How Can You Dance? asks children how they move and dance, and then compares it to the movement of an animal. For example, the book asks “How can you dance as you swim in a pool? Dance like a frog, feeling fine, keeping cool.”  After each rhyming line, the book includes instructions on how to move like the animal example.

Uses:  With its rhyming text and question and answer style, this book is sure to get kids off their feet! The book can be used in storytime to get kids moving, and can be used with differently abled adults and children.

Review Sources:

Cooper, I. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). Booklist, 1897.

Jones, T.E., Toth, L., Charnizon, M., Grabarek, D., Larkins, J., & Ceraldi, G. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). School Library Journal, 47(7), 90.

Roback, D., Brown, J. M., & Britton, J. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). Publishers Weekly, 248(24),85.

Search Terms: rhyme, animals, animal movements, dance, diversity, differently-abled 

Swing!: / A Scanimation Picture Book

Citation: Seder, R. B. (2008b). Swing!: A Scanimation Picture Book. New York: Workman Pub.Swing!

Ages: 0-8

Grades: Babies – Kindergarten

Description: Seder’s follow up book to the previously mentioned Gallop! focuses on children in motion. Swing!  asks readers if they can perform a variety of sports-themed activities, such as: running, kicking a ball,  and swinging a bat. The book features vibrantly-colored rhyming text in contrast with black and white scanimation images. The images are acetate paper overlays on board pages, that give the illusion of movement.

Uses:  Seder’s Swing!  is ideal for a sport-themed storytime with young children.  The book is best used in small group settings, so all readers can see the movement in the images.  Librarians and adults can read the book with children, teaching them the concepts of each action and each sport. Children can then be lead in the movements, or in small group sporting activities. For example, a librarian could read the story, and then lead students in a game of catch with foam balls.  This could be done with many of the different activities in the book. Librarians and adults could also ask students to mimic each action along with the book text. Swing!’s scanimation images will help capture attention and demonstrate sport and movement concepts to children. In addition to children, the book would be ideal for engaging reluctant readers who have an interest in sports and teens and adults who are differently-abled.

Review Sources:

Swing!. (2008). Publishers Weekly, 255(38), 58.

Seder, R. B. (n.d). Swing!

Search Terms: baseball, sports, differently-abled, rhyme

Gallop! / A Scanimation Picture Book

Citation: Seder, R. B. (2007). Gallop! / A Scanimation Picture Book. New York: Workman Pub.Gallop!

Ages: 0 – 5

Grades: Babies – PreK

Description:  Gallop! /A Scanimation Picture Book encourages readers to gallop, swing, run, and jump like a variety of different animals. Seder brings the animals’ action to life with paper over board page images and a pull tab that readers can move to make the animal look as though it is moving. The black and white images are paired with brightly colored rhyming text to create a visually appealing and engaging book for babies and toddlers.

Uses:  Seder’s Gallop!/A Scanimation Picture Book can be effectively used in a small group baby or toddler time. The moving images will capture children’s attention, and the rhyming text explicitly engages them in mimicking the animals’ movements.  This book can also be used to introduce movement concepts to young children in small group or individual settings. Children can see the animals’ movement, and then mimic on their own. This title could also be used to engage differently-abled elementary children or teens.  The technology used in the book also make it ideal for display; and with the direct nature of the questions in the text (“Can you slide like a chimp?”) adults and children reading independently may mimic on their own.  Also, this book should be considered for use in teaching parents/guardians information literacy skills and ways to engage their young child with books and reading at a young age. Librarians can use books that promote activity, with obvious engagement and appeal factors, to teach ways to engage with the text.

Review Sources:

Just, J. (2008). GALLOP!. New York Times Book Review, 21.

Seder, R. B. (n.d). Gallop!

Gallop!: A Scanimation Picture Book. (2007). Publishers Weekly, 254(47), 52.

Search Terms: scanimation, animals, animal movements, parents and children, rhyme, differently-abled