I Got the Rhythm

Citation: Schofield-Morrison, C. (2014). I Got the Rhythm. New York: Bloomsbury. I got the rhythm

Ages: 0 – 8

Grades: PreK – 2nd

Description: In I Got the Rhythm, a young girl and her mother go for a walk in a park in their vibrant, urban community. As they walk, the girl notices the rhythm of everything around her. She smells it, sees it, and hears it. The book ends with a gigantic dance party with everyone in the community.

Uses: The bright images and playful text of I Got the Rhythm makes this book a great choice for a young child or toddler storytime. Librarians can engage students by asking them to act out the different dances and movements on each page. This book is also idea for a storytime or program that incorporates many different dances and songs. Each song and dance can be a continuation of the story.

Review Sources:

I GOT THE RHYTHM. (2014). Kirkus Reviews, 82(9), 107-108.

Tags: diversity, differently-abled, music

Caps for Sale: A Tale of a Peddler, Some Monkeys and their Monkey Business

Citation: Slobodkina, E. (1947). Caps for Sale: A Tale of a Peddler, Some Monkeys, and their Monkey Business. New York: Harper & Row. Caps for Sale

Ages: 2 – 9

Grades: 1st – 3rd

Description:  Caps for Sale is the story of a cap peddler who settles down to take a nap under a tree. While he sleeps, monkeys steal his caps.

Uses: Caps for Sale is a classic children’s book that can be adapted into a movement filled storytime for younger elementary age children or toddlers. Librarians can encourage children to act like monkeys during the story, by making monkey movements, or pretending like they are climbing trees. This story could also be adapted into a game or activity where children walk around the library or storytime space looking for caps.

Review Sources:

Kirkus Reviews. (n.d). Caps for Sale. Retrieved from: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/esphyr-slobodkina-3/caps-for-sale/

Tags: monkeys, animals, hats

Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed

Citation:  Christelow, E. (1989). Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed. New York: Clarion House.  

Ages: 0 – 6

Grades:  PreKindergarten – 1st Grade

Description:  Christelow’s Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed is a classic book about counting. The monkeys jump on the bed and fall off one by one, until there are no monkeys left.

Uses: This book is a storytime classic! The rhyming text and repetitive phrases make this an idea book for young child and/or toddler storytime.  Librarians can make this book active by getting children to act out the monkey’s movements.  Children can jump with the monkeys jump, and make monkey movements during the book.

Review Sources:

Camarata, C., Jones, T. E., Gale, D., & Suhr, V. M. (1989). Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed (Book). School Library Journal, 35(11), 62.

Tags: concept books, counting, monkeys, rhyme, animals, jumping

You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses

You Are a LionCitation: Yoo, T. (2012). You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses. New York, NY: Nancy Paulsen Books.

Ages: 2 – 7

Grades: PreK – 2

Description: Yoo’s You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses introduces young children to yoga by inviting them to mimic the actions of different animals.   The book introduces children to different poses through simple movement instructions. Children are taught to be animals such as a butterfly, a frog, a lion, and a snake.  Pose instructions are accompanied by two page spreads of children of different ethnicities and animals doing the poses in the appropriate habitats for the animal.

Uses: You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses is perfect for introducing yoga during a young child or family storytime. The simple text in the book is not only ideal for young children who are learning concepts, but also for librarians and adults with no or little knowledge of yoga.  The book’s text, as well as the two page spreads invite children and readers to move along with the animals.  The book is also ideal for programs with differently-abled teens and older children.

Review Sources:

Oliver, S. (2012). You are a Lion! and Other Fun Yoga Poses.  School Library Journal, 58(3), 140.

Peters, J. (2012). You Are a Lion! And Other Fun Yoga Poses. Booklist, 108(13), 95.

You are a Lion! And Other Fun Yoga Poses. (2012). Kirkus Reviews, 80(4), 424.

Tags:
non-fiction, yoga, differently-abled, animals

Sleepy Little Yoga

Citation: Whitford, R., & Selway, M. (2007). Sleepy Little Yoga. London: Hutchinson.Sleepy Little Yoga

Ages: 0 – 4

Grades: Babies – PreKindergarten

Description:  Sleepy Little Yoga presents a yoga sequence meant to help toddlers relax before a nap or bedtime.  The story follows Yoga Babies as they do yoga poses meant to mimic various nighttime animals, such as bats, owls, and foxes.  The book includes pictures of children in the different poses, as well as tips for yoga practice and explanations of each pose.

Uses: Sleepy Little Yoga can be used during toddler storytime as a way to get children to settle down. Librarians can read the story, and then encourage adults/caregivers to help children do the different motions along with yoga baby. Sleepy Little Yoga is certainly best used in a toddler storytime program where adults/guardians interact with the toddlers.  The book can also be used in displays and recommended to parents who are looking for active ways to settle their child down when it is time to rest.

Review Sources:

Oliver, S. (2007). Sleepy Little Yoga: A Toddler’s Sleepy Book of Yoga. School Library Journal, 53(3), 202.

Talen, N. (2007). Little Yoga and Sleepy Little Yoga. Ascent Magazine, 35, 62-63.

Search Terms: yoga, parents and children, books for bedtime

How Can You Dance?

Citation: Walton, R., & López-Escrivá, A. (2001). How Can You Dance? New York: Putnam’s.How Can You Dance?

Ages: 0 – 8

Grades: PreSchool – 3

Description:  With rhyming text, How Can You Dance? asks children how they move and dance, and then compares it to the movement of an animal. For example, the book asks “How can you dance as you swim in a pool? Dance like a frog, feeling fine, keeping cool.”  After each rhyming line, the book includes instructions on how to move like the animal example.

Uses:  With its rhyming text and question and answer style, this book is sure to get kids off their feet! The book can be used in storytime to get kids moving, and can be used with differently abled adults and children.

Review Sources:

Cooper, I. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). Booklist, 1897.

Jones, T.E., Toth, L., Charnizon, M., Grabarek, D., Larkins, J., & Ceraldi, G. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). School Library Journal, 47(7), 90.

Roback, D., Brown, J. M., & Britton, J. (2001). How Can You Dance? (Book Review). Publishers Weekly, 248(24),85.

Search Terms: rhyme, animals, animal movements, dance, diversity, differently-abled 

Follow the Leader

Citation: Silverman, E., & Karas, G. B. (2000). Follow the Leader. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.Follow the Leader

Ages: 0-6

Grades: Toddlers – Kindergarten

Description:  Silverman’s Follow the Leader is the story of two brothers who play “follow the leader” with each other. The book begins with a discussion of who can be the leader first, with the oldest brother assuming the role. The children play several rounds of the game, and then the younger brother becomes the leader. Much of the text in Silverman’s book is the instructions of the game: “Hop when I hop./Skip when I’m skipping./Stop when I stop./Trot like a pony./Squat like a frog./Leap like a rabbit over this log.” The brother’s story and game is accompanied by sketches of the children doing each action.

Uses: Silverman’s Follow the Leader is ideal for an active storytime with toddlers and preschoolers. The direct nature of the text in the story invites readers and listeners to play follow the leader along with the brothers.  Librarians and teachers can read the story, and invite children to do the actions as the book as read. The story can then be followed with a game of storytime follow the leader, where the librarian or different children take turns being the leader.

Review Sources:

Heppermann, C. M. (2000). Follow the Leader. Horn Book Magazine, 76(5), 558.

Fletcher, C. (2000). Follow the Leader. Booklist, 447.

MacMillan, K. K. (2000). Follow the Leader (Book Review). School Library Journal, 46(10), 137.

Tags:  brothers, games

 

Dogi the Yogi

Citation: Scrivan, M. N. (2008). Dogi the Yogi. Outbox Media.Dogi the Yogi

Ages: 4 – 8

Grades:  PreK – 1

Description:  Meet Dogi, a bright yellow dog who enjoys yoga. In this book, Dogi introduces children to a variety of different yoga poses; including the wheel pose, lion pose, and shivasana. Each pose is accompanied by a drawing of Dogi doing the pose, as well as rhyming text that explains the pose and its benefits.

Uses:  The bright pictures, and simple, rhyming text of Dogi the Yogi make it an ideal resource for introducing children to yoga in a group storytime. Librarians and teachers can read each page, and lead children through the different poses along with Dogi. This book would also be well used in a family storytime, so that librarians and teachers can teach both parents and children yoga together. Dogi the Yogi’s inviting cover will also make this book ideal for display.

Review Sources: none.

Tags: yoga, animals, rhyme

Arnold’s Fitness for Kids Ages Birth – 5: A Guide to Health, Exercise, and Nutrition

Citation: Schwarzenegger, A., & Gaines, C. (1993). Arnold’s Fitness for Kids Ages Birth-5: A Guide to Health, Exercise, and Nutrition. New York: Doubleday. 

Ages: birth – 5

Grades: PreK

Description: Arnold’s Fitness for Kids Ages Birth – 5: A Guide to Health, Exercise, and Nutrition is a guide to the basics of health and exercise for young children.  The book, targeted more towards adults who care for young children, also provides age appropriate exercises with instructional pictures and line drawings.  The book emphasizes the importance of fun and play as crucial in teaching children to love exercise.  Arnold’s Fitness for Kids Ages Birth – 5 is the first in a trilogy of books aimed at promoting exercise and nutrition to children.

Uses: Librarians, teachers, and other adults can use Arnold’s Fitness for Kids as a guide for planning age specific programming that promotes health and nutrition. Librarians can teach children the exercises provided within, and can share concepts of exercise with children. The book can also be used during a family storytime, to teach parents more about nutrition and children’s health. The text can also be used in displays during Read and Reach themed storytimes, and in parenting guides.

Review Sources: none.

Tags: exercise, non-fiction, parents and children

The Rooster Struts

Citation: Scarry, R. (2004). The Rooster Struts. New York: Golden Books.The Rooster Struts

Ages: 0-5

Grades: PreK

Description:  Scarry’s The Rooster Struts is a simple story that introduces readers to different animals and the concepts of how they move. Sentences are short and the images are large, which lends to a young child storytime. Different animals are mentioned, including roosters, chicks, bears, and ants.

Uses:  The Rooster Struts can be used in a baby or toddler storytime.  The simple pictures and short sentences lend to reading for large groups. Teachers and librarians can read each sentence, and then ask the children to mimic each animal’s movements.

Review Sources: The Rooster Struts. (n.d.). Publisher’s Weekly. Retrieved from: http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-375-83006-8

 

Search Terms:  animals, animal movements, concept books